Monday, June 1, 2020

What Should I Name Emma's Little Sister?

Emma was at the top of the pack in 2018. We will find out very soon if she's managed to hold on to her tiara, or if, perhaps Olivia, has dethroned her.  Emma has always been a popular name. Well, at least since Ross and Rachel chose it back in 2004. She was destined for greatness though, and has proved it over the past decade.

Even without "Friends," Emma was already climbing the charts. Emma ranked within the Top 100 from 1880 to 1941, decided to take a little break from her popularity before she reentered the Top 100 again in 1993. By 2002, Emma ranked as the 4th most popular name in the country. She snagged #1 in 2008, and again from 2014 to 2018. Girl is popular, but with good reason.

Emma comes from a Germanic element "ermen" which means "whole" or "universal", which helps give this name her appeal.  So much so that Emma isn't only a top name in the US, it has also received plenty of usage in Germany, France, Italy, Spain, Scandinavia and The Netherlands.

Is Emma the name for you? Popularity isn't always an issue for new parents. When a name is as beautiful and well-liked as Emma, parents will continue to use it! But the question then arises:

"What do you name a younger sibling for Emma?"

Surely, if you've fallen in love with the name Emma, you will want to find something just as lovely for her future sisters. This is where I come in. Below are 20 name suggestions that take different criteria into account.

1.  Ava


Ava offers the same popularity as Emma, and both names are also palindromes. Both Emma and Ava are old-fashioned names that sprang to fame in the early 2000s.  Similarly, a third sister could be named Hannah (#33), another palindrome name, just in case you find yourself stuck in a pattern.  Ava and Emma are two peas in a pod!

2. Nora


Nora and Emma are both 4-letter names that offer a soft, sweetness. Nora is not as popular as Emma, but she can definitely keep up. Nora also has a strong history of usage behind her, dating back to the 1880s in the US. Today, Nora ranked at #30 and would be a lovely sister for Emma.

3. Stella


Stella + Emma = one sophisticated sister-set. These two names have a great balance together, perhaps it is that they both boast double-letters and an "a" ending, but they vary in sound. Stella is not as popular as Emma, but she does rank at #38 in 2018 and may continue rising in popularity. Stella was a hot choice back around 1920, just like Emma was. These sassy sisters make a great pair!

4. Adele


Adele has that similar sophistication vibe of Stella, these 3 together would make a terrific trio. Even more reason, both Emma and Adele have German, English and Italian usage, making both names have universal appeal in multiple cultures. What's nice about Emma and Adele together, is that they are comprised of differing but trendy sounds.  Both Em- and Ad- names are hot right now. Unlike Emma's popularity, though, Adele is less common, ranking at #898.

5. Everly


For some alliteration, Emma and Everly are a dynamic duo. Pairing these together gives them the similarity of the letter E, but they are different in style. Everly brings a more spunky vibe to Emma's girly sweetness, but both are very trendy and posh in their own right. Right now, Everly is a fast rising star, plucked from obscurity! She entered the Top 1000 as of 2012, and broke in to the Top 100 by 2017. I see her rivaling Emma for the throne in a couple years.

6. Sadie


Sadie brings a variety in sounds, when compared to Emma. Some parents don't want names that are too similar, so the rest of the names on this list differ in sound. Style-wise, Emma and Sadie are both very sweet, old-fashioned names. I could picture them on modern-day sisters, and sisters from the 1920s. They have a charm about them as a sib-set, similar to the reason I chose Nora above. Sadie is not as popular, but still holds her own at #87.

7. Vivian  


To continue with names that differ in sound, Vivian seems like an obvious sister name to Emma. While Emma means "universal", Vivian means "life", so their meanings go hand-in-hand. They have the same old-fashioned vibe, but also could be the names of starlets on the red carpet. Vivian has been on the rise, currently ranking at #96.

8. Sophie 


While sister-name Sophia has been swapping popularity ranks with Emma for years, sweet Sophie has stayed more under the radar in the US, ranking at #98. However, in England, Sophie has been quite popular, ranking at #1 in 1996. I could definitely see Emma and Sophie as sisters walking the streets of London. These posh names deserve to be used together.

9. Paisley


Emma could also go well with more modern names like Paisley (#52) or Kinsley (#63), or Riley (#28) too; similar to what I wrote about Everly, above. If you are leaning more toward this style now for your second daughter, it can definitely work. Emma and Paisley seem very sassy and cool together, especially if you want your girls to have their own style with very different sounding names.

10. Harper


To go even one step further, unisex choices like Harper, Piper, Avery or Quinn can provide a very interesting contrast to Emma. Emma tends to be considered more cute and girly, however, names like Harper can have a feminine charm of their own despite being considered more unisex. Emma and Harper work very well together even though they have very different sounds and styles.


Of course, these are just MY top 10 picks to pair with Emma. It's completely subjective. You may even disagree in your perception of some of these names, but that's the beauty of naming! There are no right or wrong answers. I just wanted to offer my thoughts on these names to give you some inspiration when choosing a name for Emma's little sister.   Which names would YOU pair with Emma?

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

Elisabeth and Julia Are Getting A Baby Sister! What Should I Name Her?

Brenda wrote to The Art of Naming on Facebook recently inquiring about name ideas for a third girl. She already has Elisabeth "Elsa", and Julia. I promised I would find 10 name ideas for her to consider.

First, a bit of background info.  Elisabeth is an alternative spelling to Elizabeth; some may even find the "s" to be even more feminine than the standard "z". Both variants are gorgeous, in my book!  Elizabeth comes from  the Greek form of the Hebrew name אֱלִישֶׁבַע ('Elisheva') meaning "my God is an oath".  I have written about Elizabeth's longevity in the past because she has proved to be the most enduring female name.

Julia is one of my favorite names. I used Juliet for my own daughter's middle name, and I have always been drawn to the Jul- names. Julia is the feminine form of the Roman family name Julius that was possibly derived from Greek ιουλος (ioulos) meaning "downy-bearded" which implies youthfulness. It can be said that the Jul- names mean "youth".  Julia is also a time-tested name, enduring from Ancient Roman times until today.

Now, as of 2018, Julia ranked at #93 in the US.  This spelling of Elisabeth ranked at #789, and Elizabeth was #13.  Both of these names are true classics, one Hebrew, one Latin.  I will attempt to find 10 more names with a similar, romantic classiness without using any of Elizabeth's many, many diminutives (like Isabella, Liliana, etc). 

So, here is what I might name a sister for Elsa and Julia:

1. Caroline or Charlotte


These two names are related and similar enough that I couldn't decide between them.  They both come from the Germanic name Karl meaning "man". Right now, Charlotte is the more popular of the two, ranking at #6 in the US in 2018. Caroline follows at #55.  Both of these names are in line with the classic vibe of Elisabeth and Julia.

2. Helena 


Helena is the English form of the Greek ‘Ελενη (Helene) probably meaning "torch" or "bright light".  With Elsa and Julia, I would probably pronounce it  heh-LAY-nə, but there's also HEH-li-nə, heh-LEE-nə.  This name choice is a bit more unexpected than some of the names on this list, but it is a romantic and beautiful choice. It's also less common, ranking at #458.


3. Vivian or Vivienne


Whichever spelling you choose, this name means "life" and is certainly a lovely choice. It has come a long way from the old-fashioned vibe it once had. Nowadays, it is quite modern. Elsa, Julia and Vivienne would be a gorgeous sister-set!  Vivian is more popular, ranking at #96, while Vivienne ranks at #268. If you ask me, there's something extra special about the longer, French spelling.

4. Katherine or Catherine


Where there's an Elizabeth, there's almost certainly a Katherine nearby. These two seem to go very hand-in-hand. At least in my head. Since you have an Elisabeth, I would suggest Catherine as the spelling choice. These two names have their etymology debated heavily, but the name-nerd world has seemed to decide on the meaning "pure" from the Greek  καθαρος (katharos). Right now, Katherine is more popular at #112, while Catherine ranks #204 in the US in 2018. Elsa, Jules and Cat would be cute and spunky nickname options for this trio.


5. Arabelle or Annabelle


These two names are similar in spelling, and might actually be related. It is said that Arabella is probably a Medieval Scottish variant of Annabel. Annabel was influenced by the name Anna, but comes from the Medieval name Amabel meaning "loveable". Annabelle is more common, ranking at #141, while Arabelle is uncommon at #1734. These are both beautiful options that would pair nicely with Elisabeth and Julia.

6. Scarlett


Reminiscent of the deep, romantic shade of red, and the popular character O'Hara, Scarlett is a bold choice. Yes, it is quite popular these days at #20, but it is a little more outside-the-box compared to classics like Elisabeth and Julia. The name itself is possibly derived from the Persian سقرلاط (saghrelat) and referred to a kind of cloth, or a person who made clothes from that cloth.  It's an interesting angle that you could take if you wanted something popular but different from your current sibset.

7. Valentina


Queue the romance. As a feminine form of the Roman name Valentinus, this name means "strong, vigorous, healthy" in Latin. Due to the association between Valentine's day and love, Valentina would be a gorgeous, romantic name option. It is also quickly gaining popularity, climbing the charts to #81 most recently. Valentina would be a bit bolder of a choice, but at the same time, it would pair nicely with Elisabeth and Julia.

8. Marianne or Margaret


When you think of classic names, Mary has to come to mind. However, it's a bit dated. With Elisabeth and Julia, I might look for a variant of Mary, such as Marianne, Marigold, Marilyn, Marie, Mae or even Miriam.  The other alternative is similar name Margaret (or Marjorie or Maisie) meaning "pearl". Plenty of options here that may go well with Elsa and Julia.

9. Seraphina


If you want something that sounds like it should be popular, but is actually still very under the radar, look no further than Seraphina. With the popularity of Sarah and Sophia, which sound similar, you'd think this name would be used more. It actually has never ranked within the Top 1000. It currently sits at #1098 but I could see it catching on soon. Seraphina is the feminine form of the Late Latin name Seraphinus, derived from the biblical word seraphim, which was Hebrew in origin and meant "fiery ones".  Elisabeth, Julia and Seraphina make a beautiful trio!

10. Camilla


Camilla comes from the Ancient Roman name Camillus which seems to have an unknown meaning. It may refer to a young religious or ceremonial attendant; someone employed in a church. Camilla has been in use for a long time in the US, but it has never been as popular as it is today. In 2018, it ranked at a high peak of #302 and I suspect it will continue to climb the charts. Elsa, Julia and Camilla sound just lovely together!


I suppose that was more than just 10 options, but you can use these ideas as inspiration!  Let me know what YOU would name a sister for Elsa and Julia.

Wednesday, February 5, 2020

Ferelith

Today I want to take a closer name at a very rare and fantastical-esque name. I recently had the opportunity to recommend it to someone who had never heard of it before. They instantly fell in love with it and decided it might just be THE name they have been searching for. Perhaps you will enjoy it too!



It is a rare feminine name of Scottish and English origin. It comes from the Medieval Gaelic name Forbflaith which means "overlord, ruler, or sovereign". There was an heiress in 13th-century Scotland who was named Ferelith. Aside from that, this name is very rare.

According to the US record, there has never been at least 5 babies given this name in a single year. That means that the chances of you running into someone with this name are slim to none.  If you are looking for a beautiful, rare name, this would make your child truly one-of-a-kind! With its Medieval origins, it has a Renaissance vibe, and also feels fantastical.

There are some other names that have a similar feel to them such as:  Aerith, Allifair, Caisséne and more.  If you're a fan of Ferelith, here are a variety of middle name ideas:

Ferelith Maeve
Ivy Ferelith
Ferelith Rose
Nola Ferelith
Ferelith Riley
Tieve Ferelith
Ferelith Rhiannon
Kathleen Ferelith

What would you pair with Ferelith? I do like mainstream Irish names like Maeve to go with it. Is this a name you might add to your list?


Sunday, December 22, 2019

Fabulous Names from Netflix's "The Witcher" Series





Image result for the witcher

We have recently started watching Netflix's The Witcher and I was instantly mesmerized by the names of the characters. I'm a sucker for the unusual. I may not use most of these for a real life child, but I do appreciate them in a fantastical fiction.  I made a list of them for your browsing pleasure:


Male:
Geralt
Jaskier
Istredd
Cahir
Dara
Eist
Lazlo
Filavandrel
Torque
Foltest
Danek
Artorius
Korin
Fletcher
Anton
Nettly
Yurga
Eyck
Chireadan
Zigrin
Adonis
Hemet
Remus
Tsoka
Filip
Yannick
Atlan
Mikal
Peregrine
Nonim
Vyr

Female:
Ciri
Yennefer
Triss
Calanthe
Fringilla
Tissaia
Sabrina
Vanielle
Danica
Renfri
Eithne
Zola
Tiffania
Pavetta
Toruviel
Anica
Marilka
Téa
Véa
Kalis
Fola
Glacella
Marites
Sancia
Isadora
Adda
Lilja
Coral
Kaveri
Aridea

There's definitely a few in there that would be suitable for a child, but the rest are truly just fun. Which do you like?

Thursday, September 19, 2019

Nautical Names for Sea Lovers

Now that summer is coming to an end, let's take a look at some of the beachiest, ocean-related baby name options. Even though I come from more landlocked areas, it is hard to deny that the ocean is a powerful force. For those of you that love the sound of nautical names, here are ideas to consider:

Boy Names:

Anchor
Bay
Fisher
Kai
Marinus "of the sea"
Ocean
Tide


Girl Names:

Aqua
Coral
Cordelia "jewel of the sea"
Darya "sea, ocean"
Isla "island"
Marina "of the sea"
Marisol "sea and sun"
Nerissa "of the sea"
Oceane
Pearl
Sailor

These are just a few gems. Can you think of any others that would be suitable? Which is your favorite?  If you're looking for more watery ideas, try this list.

Wednesday, June 12, 2019

Musical Baby Names



If music is your passion, take inspiration from this list of musical baby names! Many of these are derived from Latin or Italian terms found throughout music, some are names of famous musicians and composers.

Girls:

Allegra
Aria
Boheme
Cadence
Cadenza
Calypso
Carol
Celeste
Ceridwen
Chantal
Collet
Casella
Chantry
Clementi
Corisande
Echo
Hadley
Harmony
Harper
Hymn
Kalliope
Lyre
Lyric
Madrigal
Melody
Minuet
Musette
Octavia
Opera
Piper
Rhapsody
Rossini
Sonatina
Scarlatti
Sempre
Senza
Serenade
Siciliana
Sinfonia
Sonata
Song
Toccata
Viola

Boys:
Adagio
Amadeus
Apollo
Artemy
Bach
Barret
Brahm
Bran
Brio
Bryant
Cadeo
Cello
Dorian
Elegy
Florian
Hymn
Kohler
Landler
Larsen
Lyric
Mandolin
Mozart
Muzio
Olivier
Ottorino
Rhapsody
Reed
Rock
Rowley
Rossini
Rhythm
Sebestian
Wolfgang

The above lists included musical terms and classical musicians. The following list is a little more modern. This includes the names of many influential artists of the past century that may be interesting choices for big fans to choose. Some of these names are firsts, some are surnames. Some of these are from individuals and some are based on band names.  Some even cross genders, for example, the great Tina Turner could be honored by a boy named Turner. How many more can you think of that could be added?

Modern options based on famous musicians:

Girls:
Aaliyah
Abba
Adele
Alanis
Alessia
Aretha
Ariana
Ashanti
Audra
Avril
Beyonce
Billie
Björk
Britney
Camila
Carrie
Celine
Chaka
Cher
Ciara
Christina
Collins
Cyndi
Diana
Eartha
Enya
Etta
Everly
Faith
Gwen
Halen
Halsey
Holly
Jewel
Joni
Joplin
Joss
Journey
Jovi
Katy
Kelly
Lennox
Macy
Madonna
Mariah
Marley
Nirvana
Pearl
Presley
Queen
Reba
Rihanna
Sade
Santana
Selena
Shakira
Shania
Sia
Sinéad
Stefani
Stevie
Taylor
Trisha
Tori
Whitney

Boys:
Allman
Angus
Autry
Axl
Beck
Bing
Blake
Billy
Bono
Bowie
Bruce
Bruno
Buddy
Cash
Chance
Chesney
Chester
Clapton
Cobain
Coltrane
Cooper
Crosby
Cyrus
Dean
Denver
Dierks
Domino
Drake
Dre
Duran
Dylan
Elton
Elvis
Floyd
Garth
Grohl
Hank
Hendrix
Iggy
Jackson
Jagger
Joel
Judas
Lennon
Levine
Lionel
Lynyrd
Madden
Marley
McCartney
Mercury
Morrison
Morrissey
Neil
Nelly
Niall
Ozzy
Perry
Prince
Quincy
Ramone
Ray
Reznor
Sabbath
Simon
Smokey
Stevie
Stone
Swift
Turner
Tyler
Urban
Usher
Van
Vedder
Wayne
Wyclef
Zayn
Zedd
Zeppelin

Wednesday, March 13, 2019

Name Search Report: Madeline, Charity, Juniper and More Girl Names You Seek!



Charity comes from the word charity meaning "generous love" from the Late Latin caritas, or "dear, beloved" from the Latin carus. It's known as a virtue name and was used by the Puritans. Surprisingly, Charity has been consistently -- albeit uncommonly -- used since records began in the US in 1880. It peaked from 1974-1980 or so, ranking as high as #183 in 1975. It left the Top 1000 in 2013. In 2017, there were 192 girls named Charity.

Andrea is the Italian form of Andreas, which comes from the Greek name Ανδρεας (Andreas), meaning "manly", and related to Andrew. Andrea can be both masculine and feminine. As a female name, it gained usage in the 17th century before becoming common more recently. It started climbing the charts in the 1940s for girls and continued to steadily climb, peaking in 1981 at #24 and over 11,600 births. Today it ranks at #128.

Rose may seem like a filler name now but it is truly an underrated classic with many longer variations and related names from Rosalie and Róisín to Rosabella and Rosette. It comes from Germanic elements referring to a kind of fame. Of course it is also derived from the Latin rosa in association with the flower. Always popular, Rose peaked in 1917 with 9,783 births. It declined after the 1950s, but is currently upticking again, ranking at #141 with 2,059 births in 2017.

Bridget is the Anglicized form of the Irish name Brighid meaning "exalted one". It has usage in Irish mythology as the goddess of fire, poetry and wisdom. It has also been used by several saints. Bridget has been used in the US since the 1880s on record, and has always ranked within the Top 1000. It wasn't until the 1960s that it began rising in popularity. It peaked in 1973 with 2,765 births for the year. It has slowly declined since then, receiving 432 births in 2017 for a rank of #674.

Aberdeen is a Scottish Gaelic name meaning "mouth of the Don" which is a river. It's a nature name and also a city in Scotland. This could be both masculine and feminine, but it only has US usage for females. However, births are very rare. There were two listings way back in 1919 and 1923 for a handful of births, but it wasn't heard from again until 1997. It has had regular usage since 2010, even as many as 25 births in 2017!

Aurora is a triple threat. She was the Roman goddess of the morning, meaning "dawn" in Latin; she is a Disney Princess; and is also relevant to the Northern Lights from the term "Aurora Borealis", which makes her a celestial phenomenon. This name gives you a lot of bang for your buck! No wonder it is skyrocketing in popularity! It has always managed to remain within the Top 1000 since the 1880s, but it has been climbing mostly since 2006, joining the Top 100 in 2015 and ranking at a high of #51 in 2017!

Ellie dates back in standalone usage to the 1880s, but it wasn't until the 2000s rolled in that it really started to shine! It joined the Top 1000 in 1992, and made it into the Top 100 by 2011, which is a pretty fast pace. Now it ranks as the 44th most popular name in the country in 2017. This is quite impressive for a diminutive, nickname name whose modest beginnings come longer names such as Eleanor, Elizabeth and Ellen.

Tracy comes from an English surname meaning "domain belonging to Thracius", originally from a Norman French place name. It is also sometimes used as a nickname for Theresa. It has always been unisex, starting near the same time in the US for both genders in the 1880s. However, this name skyrocketed for females in the 1960s, peaking in 1970 with 18,467 births and a high ranking of #10 in the country. At the same time there were 1,774 male births.

Madeline is the English form of Magdalene, which comes from a title referring to someone from Magdala. Madeline had a nice popularity boost in the 1910s, then peaked at its highest in 1998 at #50. While Madeline with this spelling has always been around since the 1880s, Madelyn is currently more popular. Madelyn surpassed Madeline between 2008 and 2009. Both spellings remain popular in 2017 with Madeline at #100 and Madelyn at #63.

Maria is related to Mary from the Greek Μαρια and the Hebrew מִרְיָם. Mary's meaning isn't certain, but it could be either "sea of bitterness", "rebelliousness", or "wished for child". While Mary has obviously been extremely popular, perhaps the most-used female name over time, Maria is slightly less popular. It still ranks well, peaking in 1964 with 10,140 births; and as of 2017, it still received 2,700 births for a rank of #111.

Penelope may come from the Greek πηνελοψ (penelops) which is actually a kind of duck. Another possibility is that pene means "threads" and ops means "face, eye" which could refer to a weaver. Penelope was famously the name of the wife of Odysseus from Homer's epic The Odyssey. This name wasn't consistently used until the 1910s in the US, and it had a small peak in usage in the 1940s. By the new millennium, Penelope was on her way up. It entered the Top 1000 in 2001 and the Top 100 in 2013. It was #24 in 2017.

Daisy is directly related to the flower. However, it also derives from the Old English word dægeseage meaning "day eye". Sometimes Daisy is used as a nickname for Margaret due to the French name Marguerite becoming associated with the daisy in French. Margaret means "pearl" in Greek, and daisies were considered "pearls of the field" or "marguerites". In the US, Daisy has been used as a given name since records began in the 1880s. It was well used around the 1920s before declining to its lowest point in the 1970s. It rose again after that, reaching a popularity peak in 1996 with 2,514 female births for the year and a rank of #124. It ranked at #170 in 2017.

Vivienne is the French feminine form of the Latin Vivianus, which comes from the word vivus meaning "alive". The spelling "Vivian" has always been much more common. It peaked in 1920 with over 4,100 births for the year. It declined between the 1960s and the 1990s, but it is climbing again in recent years, ranking as high as #97 in 2017. Whereas, Vivienne didn't pop up until 1895 in the US. It remained rare and ranked outside the Top 1000 until it suddenly leapt on the scene in 2009 with a ranking of #531. In 2017, it climbed up to #252.

Elodie is the French form of Alodia which may be derived from a Visigothic name with Germanic elements such as alja meaning "foreign" and aud meaning "wealth". Talk about a name plucked from obscurity! It only ever received handfuls of births over the years since the 1880s, (anywhere from 5 to a high of 19 births in 1917); it wasn't used at all from the 1960s up until 1987 when it regained usage. It hasn't cracked the Top 1000 yet, but it is certainly on its way up the charts! It scored 251 births in 2017 for a rank of #1,025.

Juniper is derived from the Latin word iuniperus or juniperus which is a combination of the word junio which means "young" and parere which means "to produce". These put together equal "youth producing" or "evergreen". Of course, a Juniper is a type of evergreen tree. Beyond this, Juniper could also be a derivation of the Welsh name Guinevere. Juniper was unused in the US until 1969, and it wasn't until 2011 that it entered the Top 1000. By 2017, it reached new heights of #314 for the year.

Veronica is taken from the name Berenice which comes from the Greek name Φερενικη (Pherenike) meaning "bringing victory". Veronica was also influenced by the Latin phrase vera icon which gives it the alternate meaning "true image". Even dating back to 1880, Veronica has always ranked within the Top 500.  It was most popular between the 1960s and the 1990s. It's on the downslope now, but still ranked at #378 in 2017.

Lillian is likely a diminutive of Elizabeth, which means "my God is an oath" in Hebrew. Lillian is also considered an elongation of Lily, which comes from the flower and the Latin lilium. Lillian has always been common but it was super popular 100 years ago. In 1920, it received a peak of 10,049 female births for the year. By the 1960s it declined again to receiving 1000 or less births a year. However, starting around the early 1990s, it regained popularity, hitting a modern high of 7,156 births in 2012 for a rank of #26. It now ranks at #27 in 2017.

Meredith comes from the Welsh name Maredudd or Meredydd which may mean "great lord" or "sea lord". It was originally a masculine name, but sometime around the 1920s it gained more usage for females, however, it remains masculine in Wales. In the US, it continued to have male usage as recently as 2011. Overall, it is most common for girls, especially peaking between the 1970s and 1990s. In 2017, there were 626 girls named Meredith for a ranking of #496.

Adelaide  has been around since the SSA began recording names in 1880. It comes from the German Adalheidis which is composed of the elements adal meaning "noble" and heid meaning "kind, sort, type." Before the name's modern spike in popularity, the year with the most number of births was 1917 with 537.  Adelaide has only had two popularity spikes, the first starting around 1912 and lasting until it declined in the mid 1920s. From the 1950's to the 1990's, Adelaide was rarely used. However, starting just before the year 2000, Adelaide gained more usage. In 2005, it landed in the top 1000 and has been climbing in popularity. It ranked at #276 in 2017.

Which of these names do you like the most? Would you use any?

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