Friday, September 27, 2013

Name of the Week: Catalina

The Girl Name of the Week comes to us in honor of this week's "Spanish Names For Girls" list. I have to admit that I had a very hard time choosing just one name to feature since so many of them stood out to me. I finally decided on Catalina, pronounced kah-tah-LEE-nah.


It is a Spanish form of Katherine. Now, I've always seen Katherine-type names meaning "pure" but after looking deeper into possible meanings, I'm not so sure which is truly "correct."  Here are the original possibilities:

  • From the Greek name Αικατερινη (Aikaterine) 
  • From the earlier Greek name ‘Εκατερινη (Hekaterine) which came from (hekateros) meaning "each of two" which is similar to the goddess Hecate's name.
  • From the Greek αικια (aikia) meaning "torture" which is obviously not ideal.
  • From a Coptic name meaning "my consecration of your name."

Eventually, these were put on the back-burner and Katherine solely became associated with the Greek καθαρος (katharos) meaning "pure." To ensure that this would be the most popular meaning, early Christians changed its Latin spelling from Katerina to Katharina.

As for Catalina, it seems to be used most often in geography. There is a city in Arizona, an island off the coast of California, and another island near the Dominican Republic, just to name a few of the many.

As a given name for girls, it is used all over the Spanish-Speaking world including actresses and musicians and athletes from Argentina, Cuba, Colombia, Ecuador, Chile and Mexico. There are several Catalinas from Romania as well since they use the same spelling. Unfortunately, there is an American pornographic actress with the name. Not sure if that ruins it for you or not.  However, that's just one person on a very long list of somewhat famous Catalinas from around the world!

Source
Let's look at the stats! Catalina has been used in the States since 1893!  It remained in the double-digits for births until 1974. It broke into the Top 1000 in 1989.  Slowly but surely, more and more girls receive the name every year! As of 2013, there were 773 girls given the name which ranks it at #395, a brand new record-high!

I think it is gorgeous! I would use this instead of Catherine or Katherine and use the classy nickname Kate, the cutesy nicknames Cat or Cata (cah-tah) or the lovely and unique Lina.

Sibling Name Ideas:
Sisters: Alejandra, Bianca, Cristina, Estella, Ignacia, Juliana, Lucinda, Mercedes, Paloma, Selena
Brothers: Armando, Cordero, Diego, Eduardo, Felipe, Joaquin, Leandro, Maximo, Oswaldo, Vicente

Middle Name Ideas:
Catalina Rose
Catalina Inez
Catalina Pilar
Catalina Isobel
Catalina Luz
Catalina Socorro

As a Middle Name:
Dolores Catalina
Grisel Catalina
Leonor Catalina
Maite Catalina
Raquel Catalina

Whether you have any Spanish roots or not, what do you think of this lovely name?

Tuesday, September 24, 2013

Spanish Names for Baby Girls


Spanish names for girls are so lovely! If you are looking for a name with Latin flair, take a look at this list! Every one of these names would flow wonderfully with a Spanish last name, and some of them would even work with a non-Spanish last name.

No matter what origin your surname is, you've got to admit that these names are beautiful!  Which is your favorite?
Adabella
Adelina
Adriana
Aitana
Alba
Alejandra
Alicia
Alondra
Amada
Ana
Angel/a
Aniceta
Arabella
Aracely
Aroa
Belen
Belisma
Benecia
Bianca
Blanca
Calida
Camila
Candela
Carlota
Carolina
Catalina
Christabel
Clementina
Concepcion
Consuela
Cristina
Daniela
Delores
Dulce
Eliana
Esmeralda
Estela
Estrella
Eulalia
Evalia
Felicidad
Fidelia
Francecsa
Gabriela
Gloria
Graciela
Guadalupe
Havana
Ignacia
Ines
Irati
Isabella
Jacinta
Jimena
Juliana
Karina
Laia
Lenora
Liliana
Lolita
Lorena
Lucia
Lucinda
Magdalena
Maite
Mariana
Marisol
Maritza
Marta
Mercedes
Milagra
Natalia
Nerea
Noa
Nuria
Pabla
Paloma
Paulina
Penelope
Pilar
Ramona
Raquel
Rosalinda
Selena
Soledad
Teresa
Trinidad
Valentina
Valeria
Verdad
Xaviera
Ximena
Xiomara
Yara
Yesenia
Yolanda
Ysabel
Zamora
Zita
Take a look the list of Spanish Boy Names from last week as well! If you need a bit of advice to choose the perfect name, or some suggestions for a first and middle name combination, check out the "Naming Services" page. I'd be glad to help! :)

Friday, September 20, 2013

Name of the Week: Javier

The Boy Name of the Week comes straight off the list of Spanish Boy Names: Javier!

Javier is the Spanish form of the name Xavier. Both of these names come from the Basque place name Etxaberri which means "the new house". Over time, it became Exaberri, then dropped the beginning e and final i. The X was originally pronounced with more of a "sh" sound.


With influences from English, French and Spanish, pronunciation varies. Javier is typically pronounced the Spanish way "hab-YAIR" with a sort of combined b and v sound. In Portuguese, it still has a "sh" sound in place of the X. French would say HAV-ee-ay, and in English it is most correctly said ZAV-ee-er even though famous characters like Charles Xavier from the X-Men comics have influenced the pronunciation of X-ay-vee-er.

A notable Xavier was St. Francis Xavier, or San Francisco Javier in Spanish (1506-1552). Once he gained fame as a Jesuit priest and missionary, many places and people were named after him and therefore Xavier and Javier also gained popularity.

Javier was a place (town? city?) within the Kingdom of Navarre which was located between present day Spain and France on the Spanish side.

Source
Javier has been used in the US since 1917. It has gained popularity on a strictly upward trajectory until its usage began to decline after its high-peak in 2001. There were 2,635 boys born with the name, ranking it at a high of #149.  In 2012, it ranks at #211 with 1,759 births.

 What would you pair it with?  Source | Source

Sibling Name Ideas for Javier:
Sisters: Araceli, Delilah, Elsa, Guadalupe, Luz, Maria, Marisol, Veronica, Yolanda
Brothers: Antonio, Carlos, Cesar, David, Francisco, Jorge, Luis, Miguel, Rafael

Sibling Name Ideas for Xavier:
Sisters: Alaina, Bethany, Diana, Isla, Julia, Natalie, Olivia, Sabrina, Sophia
Brothers: Alexander, Christian, Dominic, Elijah, Felix, Gabriel, Isaac, Patrick, Zachary

Middle Name Ideas for Javier:
Antonio Javier
Javier Vicente
Enrique Javier
Javier Esteban

Middle Name Ideas for Xavier:
Jacob Xavier
Xavier Riley
Landon Xavier
Xavier Amadeus

Wednesday, September 18, 2013

World-Wide Wednesday: Spanish Names

Spanish baby-naming traditions vary slightly from country to country, but overall, they are very similar. These customs appear in Spain, Mexico, certain islands in the Caribbean, Central America, and South America. The latter four are grouped together and called "Hispanic America."

In Spain, people today tend to bear a single given name and two surnames, or perhaps a "composite first name" like Juan Pablo followed by two surnames. The first surname is the father's first surname, and the second is the mother's first surname. Occasionally, the father's and mother's surnames could be reversed, but every sibling must have the same two surnames in the same order. It is so important that if the parents cannot agree on whose surname goes first, it is taken to court for an official to decide.

For example, if a man named Alberto Sanchez Hernandez and a woman named Maria Ruiz Gonzales have a son named Eduardo, the child's name would most likely be Eduardo Sanchez Ruiz.

If his child were to be addressed formally (Mr. or Señor) Eduardo Sanchez Ruiz, he would be called Señor Sanchez or Señor Sanchez Ruiz, but he would never be called Señor Ruiz. Sometimes, the first name would be used with the title "Don" as in Don Eduardo, but that is a fading custom.

Hispanic American naming customs are very similar to the traditions that are practiced in Spain. Many of them do have the "composite first name" which is basically what Americans think of as a first and a middle. They continue the surname tradition, using one paternal and one maternal.  They do not have "middle names."

In the past, traditions varied a bit. I'm sure you have heard of Spanish names that are incredibly long. For example, there is the Saint Teresa de los Andes whose real name is Juana Enriqueta Josefina de los Sagrados Corazones Fernández del Solar.

"Juana", "Enriqueta" and "Josefina" are her first names, followed by the second name "de los Sagrados Corazones" which reflects where she is from. Her paternal surname is "Fernández" and her maternal surname is "del Solar".

Sometimes "de" or "del" or "de los/las" will be used in a name. Like the example above, it denotes a geographical origin of the individual or of their ancestors; for example, Juan Ponce de Leon.

Other instances where this occurs include "martial conjunctions" where the wife drops her maternal surname and adds her husband's paternal surname.  Ángela López Sáenz, as wife of Tomás Portillo Blanco, would become Ángela López de Portillo.  However, this is very frowned upon in many places since it is custom for a woman to keep her birth name.

In Uruguay, it is the law to use two surnames. In Argentina, the use of two surnames is legally accepted, but often only the paternal surname is registered in the birth records, (or the maternal if there is no recognized father.) So it is common in Argentina to refer to someone by a single surname. Of course there are always special exceptions.

This common 2-surname tradition tends to get confusing when applied in the United States because laws in the US operate on the assumption that everyone has a first/middle/last name. The pattern of first/last/last makes documents and paperwork very difficult since the US sometimes tries to make the paternal surname a "middle name" and the maternal surname a "last name", which is incorrect since the officially recognized last name in Hispanic culture is usually the first one, the paternal surname, and the maternal one is ignored.

Let's talk about first names now. Parents are typically allowed to choose anything, but most will opt to honor a relative or a saint. The first part of the composite first name generally reflects the child's gender but the second part may not. For example, a boy named Jose Maria to honor Saint Mary. I have a female ancestor in my family tree named Maria de Jesus. This is rather common.

Most girls are given the first name Maria because of strong belief and respect for the Virgin Mary. Many Marias have the second part of the first name corresponding to a religious concept like Maria de la Luz (Mary of the light), but in daily life, many women will drop the Maria prefix and use the suffix portion as a social name, even though the whole thing is their legal name on paper. So she may go by Luz primarily, however addressing her as Maria is accepted.  Sometimes nicknames or diminutives or what we might call a "smoosh name" is used, such as Marisol for "Maria (de la) Soledad. These smoosh names are rather common for both genders, whether it be a given name or strictly a familial nick name.

If the girl's name includes a masculine honor name as the suffix, like Maria Jose in honor of Saint Joseph, she may be informally called Marijose, Majo, Josefina, Fina, Pepa, Pepita or Marise.  For a boy named Jose Maria, Maria is often abbreviated. So he would be Jose M. Reyes or Jose Ma. Reyes.

The Civil Registry will record the child's name as a forename and two surnames, however a child can receive an entirely different baptism name like Pedro Jose Froilan de Todos los Santos. This type of name has no legal significance and is generally only used families of royalty or nobility.

I'm sure there is so much more information that could be addressed about the customs of Spanish and Latino baby names, but I think I will stop there! I am of Hispanic descent but the lineage has been Americanized that we do not follow these customs. I have an Irish maiden name, so I received a regular first, middle and last, none of which are considered Spanish. However, my husband's name is technically first/mother's maiden/father's surname, but with American customs applied, his mother's maiden name is basically considered his middle name.

What about your family? Traditions seem to get a bit jumbled up in the US. If you have Hispanic roots, do you have a traditional Latin name or an Americanized one?  Let me know in the comments below!

If you are looking for first names that generally work well on Hispanic babies, take a look at my lists page. I have made long lists for both boys and girls!

[Note, if I have gotten any information incorrect, please let me know so I can adjust it.]

Source | Source | Source | Source

Monday, September 16, 2013

Spanish Names for Baby Boys

I'd like to share this wonderful list of names that generally work very handsomely with a Hispanic last name.

Most of these options are rather exotic and have a unique flair to them.  Which are your favorite?
Adan
Adrian
Alberto
Alejandro
Alvaro
Antonio
Armando
Arnau
Arsenio
Barto
Benicio
Bernardo
Brendano
Carlos
Carmelo
Castel
Cayo
Cesar
Chavez
Cortez
Cristobal
Cristofer
Cristian
Cruz
David
Desiderio
Diego
Dionicio
Eduardo
Efren
Elian
Emiliano
Enrique
Ernesto
Esteban
Ezequiel
Fabian
Federico
Fernando
Francisco
Gabriel
Geraldo
Gilberto
Guillermo
Hector
Hernan
Hugo
Iago
Ignacio
Iker
Isaias
Izan
Jaime
Jairo
Javier
Joaquin
Jorge
Jose
Josue
Juan
Julio
Lalo
Lazaro
Leandro
Leonardo
Luis
Manuel
Marco
Martino
Maximo

Miguel
Montego
Napier
Narcisco
Navarro
Octavio
Oswaldo
Pablo
Palomo
Pascual
Pedro
Placido
Quinto
Rafael
Ramirio
Ramon
Raul
Reynaldo
Ricardo
Rodrigo
Ruben
Salvador
Santiago
Santo
Sergio
Tadeo
Tito
Urbano
Vicente
Vidal
Vincenzo
Vivaldo
Xavier
Zebedeo
Stayed tuned for Wednesday's interesting article about Hispanic Baby-Naming Traditions, and next week's list of Spanish Names for Girls!  What do you think of this list? Are there any names that you would add? Which is your favorite?

Saturday, September 14, 2013

Best Celebrity Baby Names from 2012


There are many baby-blogs and celebrity-blogs and just general news sites that love to nitpick the monikers chosen by celebrities. The most obvious recent example is Kimye's baby North West. It basically "went viral" and everyone was talking about it. Unfortunately, due to its "punny" nature, most of the talk wasn't on the up-and-up.

Contrary to popular belief and stereotypes, many celebrities actually choose normal and lovely names. However, those are the ones that tend to get overlooked. As a media-driven society, we only remember the odd ones that fuel jokes on talk-shows.

Here are some celebrity baby name choices from 2012 that I think are great!:

Girls:
Beatrice Jean (Bryce Dallas Howard)
Pearl Clementine (Jack Osbourne)
India Rose (Chris Hemsworth)
Adalaide Marie Hope (Katherine Heigl)
Cecilia Delphine (Majandra Delfino & David Walton)
Marlowe Ottoline Layng (Sienna Miller)
Faith Evangeline Elisa (Kelsey Grammer)
Theodora Rose (Robbie Williams)
Wilhelmina Jane (Natalie & Taylor Hanson)
Olivia Mabel (Carly Smithson)
Miranda Scarlett (Rob Schneider)
Vivian Lake (Gisele Bundchen & Tom Brady)

Boys:
Thomas Colton (Jared Padalecki)
Micah Emmanuel (Sarah Drew)
Miles Alexander (Joy Williams)
Leo James (Brandon Routh)
Lorenzo Dominic (Nicole "Snooki" Polizzi)
Spencer Frederick (Donald Trump Jr)
Zane Alexander (Heather Tom)
William Luca (James Marsden)
Cyrus Michael Christopher (Claire Danes & Huge Dancy)
Maxfield David (Eric Laden)
Logan Phineas  (Ryan Murphy)
Angelo James  (Adele)

Twins: 
James Timothy & Fiona Leigh (Danny Pudi)
Charlie & Poppy (Anna Paquin & Stephen Moyer)

There were even some great first-name-only choices that I couldn't help but smile at for how very simple and normal they are:

Truman (Alexis Stewart)
Jackson (Charlize Theron)
Joshua (James Van Der Beek)
Rafael (Guy Ritchie)
Jack (Anna Faris & Chris Pratt)
Tucker (Melissa Joan Hart)
Calin (Samaire Armstrong)

Virginia (Andrea Bocelli)
Olivia (Michael Weatherly)
Lucia (Mira Sorvino)
Eliza (Caterina Scorsone)
Sienna (Adriana Lima)

So while we remember names like North West, Blue Ivy, Pilot Inspektor, Apple, etc, don't forget that there are also gems to be found in Hollywood.  2013 isn't over yet, but there have already been some lovely choices! I'll report on those after the new year!

I'm sure there are some that I've missed from 2012, but which of these are your favorites?

Thursday, September 12, 2013

Girl Name of the Week: Clara

The Girl's Name of the Week comes straight from this week's list of top baby names from Switzerland: Clara. It ranked at #8 in French-Speaking Switzerland.


Clara is a Latin name that means "bright or clear." It originates as a feminine form of the Late Latin name Clarus which itself was the name of a few early saints. Saint Clare of Assisi made this name popular in the 13th century. She left her wealthy family to found the order of nuns called the Poor Clares.

Clare was the most popular form through the middle ages, and Clara became hot in the 19th century.

It has also been featured on my up-and-coming vintage names list according to the 100 year rule. It was most popular in 1918 when 5,778 baby girls were born!

Source
Somewhere around the 1950s, the name declined in usage. Around 2000, Clara began picking up steam again, hitting a modern high-rank of #136 with 2,311 births.

In recent years, Claire has been the more popular sister, while Clara was very Olde World and European. Now that Clara is coming back into fashion with all of the other vintage chic names, I can only foresee her continuing to climb the charts over the next decade.

Clara is such an adorable and lovely name that she could be paired with a variety of names! What would you pair it with? Also, do you pronounce it Clarr-uh or Clare-uh?

Sibling Name Ideas:
Sisters: Alice, Audrey, Charlotte, Eleanor, Ella, Grace, Molly, Stella
Brothers: Alfred, Benjamin, Charles, Evan, Jack, Miles, Simon, William

Middle Name Ideas:
Clara Simone
Clara Evangeline
Clara Rose
Clara Penelope
Clara Olive
Clara Harper
Clara Isabelle

Tuesday, September 10, 2013

Top Baby Names from Switzerland in 2012

It is always fun to take a look at what kind of names are popular in other parts of the world. Sometimes, us American bloggers get so caught up writing about the Top US names that we forget to look around.

In 2012, there were 82,164 live births in Switzerland. 39,729 were girls and 42,435 were boys. Below are the top names for the babies born to parents who speak French, German and Italian but live within Switzerland.

It is so interesting that these names can come from one country and yet differ so greatly between the three languages. One thing is certain, they all tend to favor the "L" sound in many of these favorite names!  Take a look at the top 16 names for each language!

French-Speaking Switzerland:

Boys:
1. Gabriel
2. Luca
3. Thomas
4. Noah
5. Nathan
6. Lucas
7. Samuel
8. Theo

Girls:
1. Emma
2. Léa
3. Chloé
4. Zoé
5. Lara
6. Eva
7. Charlotte
8. Clara

German-Speaking Switzerland:

Boys:
1. Noah
2. Luca
3. David
4. Leon
5. Leandro
6. Nico
7. Levin
8. Julian

Girls:
1. Mia
2. Alina
3. Laura
4. Julia
5. Anna
6. Emma
7. Leonie
8. Lena

Italian-Speaking Switzerland:

Boys:
1. Gabriel
2. Alessandro
3. Leonardo
4. Matteo
5. Nathan
6. Samuele
7. Elia
8. Samuel

Girls:
1. Sofia
2. Alice
3. Emma
4. Elisa
5. Giulia
6. Martina
7. Giada
8. Giorgia

I think I would side with the French-Speaking list but they are all pretty great! Which do you like best?

Saturday, September 7, 2013

Baby Naming 101: Spell It Right!

In the never-ending quest to be unique, some parents today think the best way to do that is to use "kreeaytiv" spellings. I'm going to flat-out say it: spelling a name incorrectly is not cute.  Yes, I'm calling it "incorrect" not "creative."

If you think I'm being harsh, I apologize, but I know that many of my fellow name-bloggers would back me up on this.

Professor Kara is in the classroom.
Ponder for a minute. What are you doing to your child? Yes, it might seem cute to see a baby named Braylynn or Kaedynn, but what happens when they grow up and need to apply for a professional job? There are people who argue that a name should have nothing to do with their intelligence and credentials for said job, but could you really imagine the President of the United States being named Aiedynn Kristhian Smith when Aidan Christian Smith would be so much nicer?

Imagine 50-60 years from now when a whole new flock of babies are being born (hopefully with some really great vintage names, if this cranky old lady has a say), and the children of the 2010s are brand-new grandparents.  "Let's go to Grandpa Leeum and Grandma Abygayle's house!"  Liam and Abigail are wonderful names in and of themselves, but they're not so wonderful with those unnecessarily complicated spellings.

Keep in mind that these are real spellings from real babies born in 2012. I'm not just making these up!

While I understand that we are free to express ourselves any way we want through our children's names, I only wish it would be taken more seriously.

Misspelling a name is not cute. It does not automatically make the child unique from his peers. Considering that names are used verbally so often, the "unique" Klohie really is no different than all of the girls named Chloe. The difference is that Klohie will have issues for the rest of her life having to spell it to everyone she meets, and all of the Chloes won't.

Even more confusing than that are the following real misspelled names. Some of them don't even seem like a name! See if you can guess what it is supposed to be:

Boys:  
Celebrating 60 wonderful years together:
Rhyley Jaxxyn Miller and his lovely
wife Serynity Kaydynse Miller.

Nope, sorry, I refuse to picture it!

Izaiya
Koltynn
Graisyn
Zakori
Jysaiah
Kuper
Shaughn
Markeise
Sylys
Jailon
Icker
Daviyon
Kamaury
Khyri
Jaxsten
Akiles

Girls:

Awbree
Madylyn
Kleigh
Aerionna
Mikaelah
Miaya
Juliyanna
Skarlet
Lundynn
Jenesys
Trenidy
Jizel
Kynzley
Preslea
Deissy

Personally, I'd rather be unique by finding names that are actually rarely used. Its even better when they have a history behind them and one or two standard spellings.

There are many wonderful names that don't even rank in the Top 1000 like:

Minerva #3936
Eugenia  #4492
Andromeda #4565
Augusta #4693
Eloisa #4844
Helene #3851
Bryony #8661

Leopold #2184
Benedict #1736
Amadeus #2431
Viggo  #3680
Richmond #3952
Indiana #4032
Ewan #1245

I could go on and on. I'd much prefer these rarely used names to anything that has been tinkered with. Sophia will always be better than Sofeeya, even if it is the number one name in the country.

Above all else, remember that babies grow up to become a wide variety of people. What seems cute at the time may totally clash with who they become. For an extreme example (and some giggles) could you imagine this man named Braxxtyn or Gavynn or Loukas?

I would name him Isaac (not Izzak)
What do you think about this issue? Do you think it is fine that parents are running amok and refusing to use tried-and-true spellings? Do you think there should be some kind of baby-naming-movement that strongly, but lovingly, imposes correct spellings on new parents?  Where do YOU draw the line?

Let me know in the comment section below!

Thursday, September 5, 2013

Boy Name of the Week: Alfie

I decided to choose the Name of the Week from the Top 1000 baby names chart from England/Wales in 2012. My choice is #7, Alfie.  England is big on nickname names which basically means names that end with -ie and have a longer, "proper form" as well.  In this case, Alfie comes from the name Alfred.


Derived from Old English, Alfred is composed of elements that mean "Elf Counsel".  This name dates back as far as Alfred the Great in the 9th-century, and probably farther. He was the King of Wessex who notoriously fought against the Danes living in northeastern England. Beyond that, he was a scholar who translated many Latin books into Old English.

The name Alfred became very rare by the end of the middle ages and wasn't revived until the 18th century. Another famous Alfred was Lord Tennyson, a British poet who lived from 1809-1892.

Alfred peaked in usage in the US in 1928 when 6,244 baby boys were born, ranking the name at #33. Since then it has gone downhill.  It seems to be in danger of falling off the top 1000 chart in the next couple years at the rate it is falling. It fell to #949 in 2012 with only 211 boys born.

Source
As for Alfie, it may be #7 in England, but here in the States, it is no where near the Top 1000.  With a mere 13 births in 2012, Alfie ranks in at a very unpopular #6271. The name has always been sporadically used. There are no births on record for 2002-2005, and it is even worse before then, except for a slight peak from 1966-1978.  Alfie first appeared in the US in 1917, but it was rarely used. In fact, there were only 44 Alfie's born between 1917 and 1949, and none again until that peak in 1966.

I would use the combo Alfie James because I think its adorable.  Other ideas include Alfie Richmond, Alfie Theodore, Alfie Sebastian and Alfie Thomas.

What do you think? Are you a fan of these nickname names? Let me know what you think in the comments below!

Sibling Name Ideas:
Other Nickname Names: Archie, Charlie, Freddie, Jamie, Teddy, Willy / Ally, Betsy, Evie, Jackie, Katie, Millie, Nellie

Sisters: Alice, Caroline, Elizabeth, Genevieve, Josephine, Katherine, Marion, Rose, Tabitha
Brothers: Andrew, Arthur, Edward, Frederick, George, Henry, Jack, Matthew, Peter, Thomas

Middle Name Ideas:
Alfie Theodore
Alfie Jonathan
Alfie Logan
Alfie Benjamin
Alfie Warren

As a Middle Name:
Nathan Alfie
Wilfred Alfie
Vincent Alfie
William Alfie
Daniel Alfie

Tuesday, September 3, 2013

Top 1000 Baby Names in England/Wales for 2012


I am always fascinated by the top baby names in England/Wales too! Their population versus the population of the US is roughly 19:105. So to see such different numbers is fascinating. But even more interesting than the math is the completely different style of names that the Brits prefer.    Source.

Take a look at the Top 1000 baby names that are popular in England/Wales for the 2012 birth year!:

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